Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Tuesday Tumbling Term~ Statistical Analytics

Today's terms are are statistics and analytics.
sta·tis·tics
noun
1. ( used with a singular verb  ) the science that deals with the collection, classification, analysis, and interpretation of numerical facts or data, and that, by use of mathematical theories of probability, imposes order and regularity on aggregates of more or less disparate elements.
2. ( used with a plural verb  ) the numerical facts or data themselves.

an·a·lyt·ics
noun, ( used with a singular verb  ) Logic. the science of logical analysis
.

As an indie author or traditional author, why should you care about the numbers. They are just number, right?

Correct, they are just numbers, but they say a lot when you are trying to measure your success or failure. It's all about accountability. Being able to show results and that means numbers. What was more successful than others and what not to do again. That's how I determined my blogging format for this year by looking at the numbers- which blogs had the most hits and misses.

Many sites offer analytics (the analysis of the numbers) to help the nonmathematician break down the numbers for you. Here on Blogspot is one of the best I've seen, but Facebook has it also. They break it down into numbers and graphs. Some of us are visually gifted, so the graphs gives us instant snapshots of what's happening.

Me, I'm used to looking at the numbers and gauging success or failure. I've got a sheepskin that tells all that I am. But the average writer does not have twenty math courses and some special knowledge of statistics. They spent their money more wisely on English courses to hone their craft.

I actually did both because being able to write correctly was important in business, but I was already a writer by then. I was even teaching English as a second language courses.

To be able to express the success, you have to understand the numbers. I'll use my Blogspot account as an example. For every given post, it gives me how many unique views I've had. For example, my most successful blog was November 28, 2012 with 811 hits. So platform building is a definite winner. The whole "Wednesday Writerly Way" series is succeeding. Next in the numbers is my "Sunday Stroke Survival" blogs. They are definite keepers. Least hits are the "Friday Fun," but it's still new. Once you can see the numbers, the decision is not hard on what's working and what's not.

Now expanding on the premise of statistical analytics, it's a platform growth chart. You can see where your audience is from. I've watched this blog grow from three hits  to over three hundred hits per day and climbing. These numbers are small in comparison to other authors, but not too shoddy for one blog out of millions that could be read. I'm happy about the numbers and looking forward to more growth. It's a far cry from 1,000+ hits per day, but I'm a wild card. I'm just another indie author trying to find a niche in the market. Take a look at the track record. This blog was started in December of 2010.

Without growth of new readers, this would be the death of this author. It is measurable over time. I find the more I talk about the craft behind writing and sales, the greater my sales become. By talking about my stroke and how I'm writing now, the larger my audience and readership grows both in this blog and generation of book sales.

An agent or publisher will want to know these number to exponentially promote your manuscript. That's why platforms are so important. It equals cash. So if you haven't checked your stats for your blog yet do so.

Hope this helps you understand the importance of statistical analytics.

Keep writing and loving the Lord.

3 comments:

Zan Marie said...

I'm glad you can understand it all, Jo, but numbers are still Greek to me. After all these years, my high school statistics course is wearing a bit thin. ; )

You're doing an amazing job of promoting your books and helping other writers.

J.L. Murphey said...

Zan Marie,
Most people feel that way about statistics. Thank you.

Lewis N. Clark said...

An agent or publisher will want to know these number to exponentially promote your manuscript. That's why platforms are so important. It equals cash. feng shui master