Saturday, July 28, 2012

Dawn of a Kernel for a New Book

As you can imagine since my stroke I have been purchasing books and reading articles and blogs about strokes and recovery. Makes sense right? The subject is on my mind every waking minute right now. Rather than stew in self pity, I'm searching for alternatives for ways to accomplish life's little thing often taken for granted.

Reading is one of the few pleasures available to me. While I wait and work for recovery. Although spelling and and all but basic grammar are lost to me right now a book has formed in my mind. Everything I have read has been so serious. Adaptation, recovery and living are serious business after a stroke...heart attacks are much easier to recover from and I speak from personal experience. It struck me that after a stroke you rarely laugh at the dumb things you do. I do mean dumb. You no longer take simple tasks for granted but count them as achievements. Some of them are pretty hilarious when looking in hindsight.

I've often felt there is not enough laughter in the world and when facing a life altering event laughter is needed more than at anytime in your life so I started writing.

The book is titled "Don't Get Your Panties in a Wad." I've even designed the cover. Want to see?

There is in my searching nothing like it on the market. Forget about a year to release. I'm only typing fifty words three times a week. It's a far cry from what I used to do. My days of 10+K words daily are over for the time being. But it is progress and I'm at 700 words shooting for 75,000. It is geared for the one million stroke survivors globally each year. There is a time and place for tears and grief. What's left is the healing power of laughter.

Look for snippets here along this journey.

Keep writing and loving the Lord.

2 comments:

oc1dean said...

Actually I think your market is considerably larger. 15 million strokes a year, 2/3s survive.

J.L. Murphey said...

Yes, it is that was a conservative estimate, but when you consider who reads English it gets smaller.